Tips & Techniques

Tips From The Pros.
Review our quick tips to find the information you need. Apply the filters on the right to narrow your search.

In-Fisherman

Docks and boat houses are important cover for bass, particularly when shoreline development has depleted natural cover. High-percentage spots depend on water depth and cover options.

In-Fisherman

After the spawn, big bass quickly move to offshore structure, where they hold along humps, ledges, or deep underwater points. They're ready to feed, so whet their appetite with a big deep-diving crankbait.

In-Fisherman

River currents prevent these waters from freezing when flatwater impoundments are ice-covered. With careful presentations, river largemouth can be caught.

In-Fisherman

When water temperatures tumble below the low-40F range, bass often move from mid-depth flats to more vertical structures. Fast-breaking edges allow bass to change depth easily, without traveling long distances.

In-Fisherman

One of the hottest tactics on the pro bass trail is working deep structure with jigworms, sometimes called shaky-head worming.

In-Fisherman

Fall summons river bass to a major feast before winter sets in. Fish feel the urge to feed heavily, storing energy for the long cold period when activity is minimal.

In-Fisherman

Spring means high water in most areas, due to snowmelt and high annual rainfall. And spring means movement for river bass.

In-Fisherman

Reservoir smallmouths often congregate close to shore along riprap and rocky breaks into deeper water during early spring. The rocky shallows warm early, drawing bait.

In-Fisherman

Walking baits, poppers, propeller baits and minnowbaits twitched on top shine on rivers during the summer months. Topwaters have magic appeal for river smallmouths in warm water, too.

In-Fisherman

Within a specific range of sizes and actions, plastic worms are the most versatile and most effective tools to use for smallmouths in lakes. The right worm is 4 to 5 inches long and relatively thin.